Posted in Linux, PHP

After upgrading to 11.10 recently, I occasionally noticed fuser firing up and using between 70% and astoundingly 9999% CPU. Googling the issue led me to this post with the solution.

As user grazer explains:

We have the same problem. This is the content of /etc/cron.d/php5 on 11.10:

09,39 *     * * *     root   [ -x /usr/lib/php5/maxlifetime ] && [ -d /var/lib/php5 ] && find /var/lib/php5/ -depth -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -type f -cmin +$(/usr/lib/php5/maxlifetime) ! -execdir fuser -s {} 2>/dev/null \; -delete

And this is the content on 11.04:

09,39 *     * * *     root   [ -x /usr/lib/php5/maxlifetime ] && [ -d /var/lib/php5 ] && find /var/lib/php5/ -depth -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -type f -cmin +$(/usr/lib/php5/maxlifetime) -delete

Spot the difference?

The 11.10 version runs fuser for each PHP session file, thus using all the CPU when there are hundreds of sessions.

After commenting out the 11.10 line and replacing with the 11.04 equivalent, this problem was solved for me aswell. Thanks, grazer!

You can also check out the bug report to keep up to date on this issue. Hopefully a fix will be released quickly.

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Posted (Updated ) in PHP

I had a bit of an issue with this and the documentation wasn’t of much help so I thought I’d post about the process. I currently have CampaignMonitor and MailChimp modules in the LemonStand marketplace and wanted to allow customers to create subscription forms on their sites that AJAX submit.

Firstly, here is the documentation page on custom events. The docs show that you need two things:

  • A subscribeEvents() method in your module’s setup class containing an addEvent() call.
  • A method containing the code you want to execute, which will be triggered by your event.

I attempted to do the above with the following backend code:

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<?php
class MyModule_Module extends Core_ModuleBase
{
	public function subscribeEvents()
	{
		Backend::$events->addEvent('MyModule_Module:onSubmit', $this, 'on_submit');
	}
 
	public function onSubmit()
	{
		//...
	}
}

And frontend code:

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<form onsubmit="return $(this).sendRequest('MyModule_Module:onSubmit')" action="/" method="post">
	<input type='submit' name='submit' value='Submit' />
</form>

I submitted the form and was greeted with an error message:

An AJAX error occurred: AJAX handler not found.

After a little digging I came across the function excuted when you perform an AJAX query. Important lines are highlighted:

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public static function execAjaxHandler($name, $controller)
{
	$parts = explode(':', $name);
	if (count($parts) != 2)
		throw new Phpr_ApplicationException("Invalid event handler identifier: $name");
 
	$className = ucfirst($parts[0]).'_Actions';	if (!Phpr::$classLoader->load($className))
		throw new Phpr_ApplicationException("Actions scope class is not found: $className");
 
	$method = $parts[1];
	$isEventHandler = preg_match('/^on_/', $method);	if (!$isEventHandler)
		throw new Phpr_ApplicationException("Specified method is not AJAX event handler: $method");
 
	$obj = new $className();
	if (!method_exists($obj, $method))
		throw new Phpr_ApplicationException("AJAX handler not found: $name");
 
	$obj->copy_context_from($controller);
	try
	{
		$result = $obj->$method();
		$controller->copy_context_from($obj);
		return $result;
	}
	catch (Exception $ex)
	{
		$controller->copy_context_from($obj);
		throw $ex;
	}
}

There’s a couple of things to note here.

  • Your second and third arguments in addEvent() are ignored.
  • _Actions is concatenated onto the end of your class name
  • Your method name must start with on_

With the above in mind, it’s time for some rewriting:

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<?php
 
class MyModule_Module extends Core_ModuleBase
{
	public function subscribeEvents()
	{
		Backend::$events->addEvent('MyModule:on_submit', $this, 'on_submit');
	}
}
 
class MyModule_Actions extends Cms_ActionScope
{
	public function on_submit()
	{
		//...
	}
}

That worked like a charm. Good luck to all the module developers for LS out there – I’ve found LemonStand a number of quirks like this and we’ll just have to tackle them one at a time 🙂

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Posted (Updated ) in Linux, PHP

I’ve was playing with EasyApache in a WHM install recently and after the upgrade I came across a strange error:

SoftException in Application.cpp:357: UID of script "/home/mysite/public_html/index.php" is smaller than min_uid
Premature end of script headers: index.php

Turns out this error is caused by apache being unable to read files added by root to a users public_html folder. A simple fix for this problem is to

chown -R mysite:mysite /home/mysite/public_html

Thanks to user ronniev of eukhost forums for his solution here.

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Posted (Updated ) in Javascript, PHP

If you’re reading this page (or my blog in general) it’s a pretty safe bet you already have Google+. If you’ve uploaded any photos to Google+ from Chrome or FF, you would also have noticed its snazzy HTML5 file uploader at work. This weekend I took it upon myself to whip up a quick and dirty version of that uploader and share its inner workings with the world.

Google+ Image Uploader
Google+ Image Uploader

Here’s a short video of my uploader at work:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXx8cu6rxV4

Requirements:

  • PHP4+
  • HTML5-enabled browser (File API – including drag and drop, XHR2)
  • Some images to upload

Disclaimer: Currently only Firefox and Webkit based browsers meet the requirements above. Opera supports the File API and probably XHR2 (I haven’t tested), however it doesn’t have drag and drop so this tutorial won’t work with it. If you’re curious about whether or not IE will work with this tutorial, I’m already laughing at you.

Download the finished script here.

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Posted (Updated ) in PHP

While aimlessly browsing my Twitter feed last night, I came across this tutorial on using CodeIgniter‘s Zip class. Kohana 3.1 doesn’t seem to come with similar functionality out of the box (at least from the brief glance I took), so I figured I’d write up a quick patch to get CI’s class working with it.

Download the module with example controller and test files here.

You can read up on how to use the class in CodeIgniter’s documentation or the tutorial linked to above. I’ve included a controller and 2 test files in the download above as a kind of ‘quick start guide’. To access them simply go to /koziptest and /koziptest/invalid for a successful and unsuccessful download respectively.

There isn’t really any more to say about this one other than the fact that I made the methods in my module chainable for convenience and consistency with other Kohana classes. Note that this means the read_file, read_dir and archive methods will now throw exceptions if you use an invalid file/directory path or your input or output files aren’t readable/writable – so remember to use a try..catch block! I’ve also made the download method take a Request variable as its first argument – simply pass your controllers current request to it like so:

$Zip->download( $this->response )

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Posted (Updated ) in PHP

Update 06 June 2011: I’ve contacted the current developer and he’s accepted the patch. It should be appearing in a WP-Syntax near you shortly!
Update 16 July 2011: I’ve merged Chimo’s excellent patch which adds page range support. See the updated tutorial below for usage instructions. Thanks Chimo!
Update 27 July 2011: We have liftoff! This patch is finally part of the official plugin!

I’ve used a few different WordPress syntax highlighters in my day but WP-Syntax is easily the best of them. One issue that’s bothered me with WP-Syntax for a while now, however, is lack of line highlighting support so I decided to look into adding it myself. At the time of writing I’m using WP-Syntax 0.9.9.

To add highlighting support, open up /wp-content/plugins/wp-syntax/wp-syntax.php. You’ll need to modify two functions – wp_syntax_highlight and wp_syntax_before_filter. Here’s wp_syntax_highlight:

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function wp_syntax_highlight($match)
{
    global $wp_syntax_matches;
 
    $i = intval($match[1]);
    $match = $wp_syntax_matches[$i];
 
    $language = strtolower(trim($match[1]));
    $line = trim($match[2]);
    $escaped = trim($match[3]);
 
    $code = wp_syntax_code_trim($match[5]);    if ($escaped == "true") $code = htmlspecialchars_decode($code);
 
    $geshi = new GeSHi($code, $language);
    $geshi->enable_keyword_links(false);
    do_action_ref_array('wp_syntax_init_geshi', array(&$geshi));
 
    //START LINE HIGHLIGHT SUPPORT    $highlight = array();    if ( !empty($match[4]) )    {        $highlight = strpos($match[4],',') == false ? array($match[4]) : explode(',', $match[4]); 	$h_lines = array();	for( $i=0; $i<sizeof($highlight); $i++ )	{		$h_range = explode('-', $highlight[$i]); 		if( sizeof($h_range) == 2 )			$h_lines = array_merge( $h_lines, range($h_range[0], $h_range[1]) );		else			array_push($h_lines, $highlight[$i]);	}         $geshi->highlight_lines_extra( $h_lines );    }    //END LINE HIGHLIGHT SUPPORT 
    $output = "\n<div class=\"wp_syntax\">";
 
    if ($line)
    {
        $output .= "<table><tr><td class=\"line_numbers\">";
        $output .= wp_syntax_line_numbers($code, $line);
        $output .= "</td><td class=\"code\">";
        $output .= $geshi->parse_code();
        $output .= "</td></tr></table>";
    }
    else
    {
        $output .= "<div class=\"code\">";
        $output .= $geshi->parse_code();
        $output .= "</div>";
    }
    return
 
    $output .= "</div>\n";
 
    return $output;
}

and here’s wp_syntax_before_filter:

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function wp_syntax_before_filter($content)
{
    return preg_replace_callback(
        "/\s*<pre(?:lang=[\"']([\w-]+)[\"']|line=[\"'](\d*)[\"']|escaped=[\"'](true|false)?[\"']|highlight=[\"']((?:\d+[,-])*\d+)[\"']|\s)+>(.*)<\/pre>\s*/siU",        "wp_syntax_substitute",
        $content
    );
}

Updated/added lines are, of course, highlighted 🙂

Below is an example of the new functionality:

<pre lang=”php” highlight=”2″>
$foo = ‘foo’;
$bar = ‘bar’;
$foobar = ‘foobar’;
</pre>

$foo = 'foo';
    $bar = 'bar';    $foobar = 'foobar';

<pre lang=”php” highlight=”1,2,5-7″>
$foo = ‘foo’;
$bar = ‘bar’;
$foobar = ‘foobar’;

$foo = ‘foo’;
$bar = ‘bar’;
$foobar = ‘foobar’;

$foo = ‘foo’;
$bar = ‘bar’;
$foobar = ‘foobar’;
</pre>

$foo = 'foo';    $bar = 'bar';    $foobar = 'foobar';
 
    $foo = 'foo';    $bar = 'bar';    $foobar = 'foobar'; 
    $foo = 'foo';
    $bar = 'bar';
    $foobar = 'foobar';

Remember to add highlight to the list of allowed <PRE> tag arguments in your themes functions.php file. Details on doing so can be found here.

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Posted (Updated ) in PHP

EDIT Aug 6 2011: If you’re having trouble connecting to
{imap.gmail.com:993/imap/ssl}
try
{imap.gmail.com:993/imap/ssl/novalidate-cert/norsh}
If you get a ‘Too many incorrect logins’ error, you can unlock your account again here.

I’m a big fan of the Android platform and have been using an application called SMS Backup to send all SMS’s to Gmail for archiving (now replaced by SMS Backup+). To cut a long story short, I needed to download those SMS’s with a PHP script. SMS Backup had uploaded them all under the creatively named SMS label and so I needed a way to download all emails with a specified label. It turned out to be a relatively thing to do once you know what you’re looking for.

A quick Google search (I’m such a fanboy) will lead you to this page where a script is provided to download all email from Gmail using the IMAP protocol:

<?php
/* connect to gmail */
$hostname = '{imap.gmail.com:993/imap/ssl}INBOX';
$username = 'your username here';
$password = 'your password here';
 
/* try to connect */
$inbox = imap_open($hostname,$username,$password) or die('Cannot connect to Gmail: ' . imap_last_error());
 
/* grab emails */
$emails = imap_search($inbox,'ALL');
 
/* if emails are returned, cycle through each... */
if($emails) {
 
	/* begin output var */
	$output = '';
 
	/* put the newest emails on top */
	rsort($emails);
 
	/* for every email... */
	foreach($emails as $email_number) {
		/* get information specific to this email */
		$overview = imap_fetch_overview($inbox,$email_number,0);
		$message = imap_fetchbody($inbox,$email_number,2);
 
		/* output the email header information */
		$output.= '<div class="toggler '.($overview[0]->seen ? 'read' : 'unread').'">';
		$output.= '<span class="subject">'.$overview[0]->subject.'</span> ';
		$output.= '<span class="from">'.$overview[0]->from.'</span>';
		$output.= '<span class="date">on '.$overview[0]->date.'</span>';
		$output.= '</div>';
 
		/* output the email body */
		$output.= '<div class="body">'.$message.'</div>';
	}
 
	echo $output;
}
 
/* close the connection */
imap_close($inbox);

This gets us half way there. Now – to filter by label. As it turns out, this is ridiculously simple. Change the $hostname variable to this:

$hostname = '{imap.gmail.com:993/imap/ssl}SMS';

And with that, ladies and gentlemen, we have a completed script!

…but what if you want to retrieve only your Spam mail (not that you would), your starred mail or your deleted mail? This is also quite possible. After much more Googling I came across this blog post detailing what you need to put in your $hostname. In the instance above, it’d be

$hostname = '{imap.gmail.com:993/imap/ssl}[Gmail]/Trash';

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Posted (Updated ) in Javascript, PHP

Update Jul 02 2011: crossdomains.xml should be crossdomain.xml
Update Jun 29 2011: Updated S3 upload URL – no more security error

If you’ve ever wanted to allow people on your website to upload files to Amazon S3, you’ll know the only real way to do this is with flash – as it allows the client to upload directly instead of funneling all traffic through your server. You could write your own script for this, however there’s already a nifty little prebuilt tool I’m sure you’ve already heard of called Uploadify which can not only do the job for you, it can do so with great flexability.

For the lazy: Download the entire script here

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Posted (Updated ) in Database, PHP

NOTE: If you’re looking for the Doctrine 2 modules for K3 see this post.

Download the module here.

I’ve previously written a module for Kohana 3 for Doctrine, as well as drivers for Kohana’s Auth and Session modules, however I’ve finally had the time to merge the three and fix up some longstanding issues present with them; namely the folder structure and lack of PDO support. To make my life a little easier I’ve moved the project to Google Code too.

You can find the project here. It’s got Doctrine 1.23 already in there, you should just be able to drop it in and add it to your bootstrap file. It also includes sample schema and data fixtures for the kohana auth and session modules – they can be found in /models/fixtures.

Good luck!

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Posted (Updated ) in PHP

If you’ve ever come across the infuriating error

htmlspecialchars(): Invalid multibyte sequence in argument

I have a simple solution for you: Turn display_errors on in your php.ini file!

It turns out there’s a weird bug that doesn’t appear to be getting fixed any time soon that causes htmlspecialchars() to display this error only when display_errors is set to Off.

See this post for further details and a very big thank you to the Andy Young for writing it and saving me (and I’m sure many others) alot of time!

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